Tag Archives: comics

Letter to Meathaus: Roger Omar

Letter to Meathaus: Roger Omar

Letter to Meathaus: Roger Omar

Letter to Meathaus: Roger Omar

Roger Omar

Roger Omar sent Meathaus this envelope stuffed with beautiful things from interesting and fantastic artists. And I took an ass-long time to post it. Shame, shame on me. Lee-the-spring-semester-intern scanned some of these and had it set up for me but then I just needed to scan some more because everything is outstanding. So Roger engaged some artists to illustrate six authentic dreams from 8-10 year old children in Valencia, Spain, (and one has six dreams from a child in Tel Aviv, Israel) which remain the text accompanying each illustration, written in Spanish and English.

“Best Wishes,
and happy Dreams,
Roger Omar”

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Thank you Roger, for such strange, folding items, part book, poster, or something else. Most of them have the dream text on the opposite side and more images. It is hard to illustrate here that most of the images above where you see only two pages are only a part of the panoramic accordion fold-out illustrations on each of these publications that flow the entire length of the side of paper. Maybe Roger’s got some on a website. Let’s check. So here is the website:

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And it looks like you can check out more stuff and maybe get some books on Roger’s 6 Dreams Tumblr and here is a Flickr stash.

And of course the featured artists are Meathaus favorites: Matthew Houston, Thomas Wellmann, Max Fiedler, Wren McDonald, Amanda Baeza, and Roni Fahima.

Babylon Falling Scan Collection

Babylon Falling

Babylon Falling is a massive tumblr collection of original scans of counter culture, hip hop, and underground comics papers and magazines. You can spend a long, satisfying time digging through the archive, or just go to the front page and use the drop down menus to sort by type of image or publication. An awesome effort. Above art is “The Time Has Come Today” by Gilbert Johnson for San Francisco Express Times (1968) from this post, and the featured image above that is here.